Thursday, February 14, 2008

Don't worry, I ate your share of the pizza.

Last night a few of us got together at my house to begin sending the clear message to our representatives that we are opposed to the budget proposal that would slash funding for domestic and sexual violence survivors, and programs like PWCL and our sister agencies. It was fun, but we need more people to write and call in order to make our voices heard.

We talked about doing this again next week at someone else's house. I know a few of you own guitar hero or rock band, which could add a whole other level to getting together and calling Ron, Earl or Gordon.

You can follow this link to participate in the call to action, read more about it, and to sign up for future alerts through the Stop Family Violence organization. http://stopfamilyviolence.org/ocean/host.php?o=0,3&folder=3&T

Also, as I'm writing this post I can't help but to think about some of the critical essays in The Revolution Will Not Be Funded, talking specifically about the trouble with government funding. The book speaks truth to this current dilemma, and if you haven't checked it out yet, you really should!

3 comments:

Kelsey said...

I ate everyone's share of the orange slices.

I have offered to host a little Rock Band/writing letters/having a drinkiepoo at my place waaay out in Beaverton next weekend. Let me know if you'd be interested.

Last night as we were writing letters I felt the importance of this issue really shine through. I didn't think I would be that moved to write my own personal letters, but I feel like it was a great thing to do. I hope all of you will write some letters these coming weeks, too.

Katie C. said...

I am TOTALLY interested! Just give me a time and a place!

Aaannd I just started that book and I'm really excited about everything I'm going to learn from it.

Ledena said...

Yeah, it's complicated because I want services to be funded but I have also been trying to learn more about stuff like this:

"Beyond the Prison Industrial Complex
CARA organizes and is led by communities who are marginalized from the approach of strengthening the criminal justice system's response to sexual violence. We believe that this approach alienates people who are young, of color, queer, incarcerated, poor and/or have disabilities. As marginalized peoples, our own strategy for undermining rape culture cannot be one that reinforces the prison industrial complex — a system that targets us and only creates more violence and harassment for our communities. For this reason, CARA works to create community-based systems of accountability and support in order to build healthy relationships and communities free of both interpersonal violence and state violence.

In 2006, CARA wrote "Taking Risks: Implementing Grassroots Community Accountability Strategies," a paper written collectively by women of color about community accountability as a strategy to addressing sexual and domestic violence without the criminal justice system. It is published in Color of Violence: The INCITE! Anthology. Please contact us for more information!"

check out their site: http://www.cara-seattle.org/organizing.html